Proposal

APrIGF 2024 Session Proposal Submission Form
Part 1 - Lead Organizer
Contact Person
Ms. Jhalak M. Kakkar
Email
Organization / Affiliation (Please state "Individual" if appropriate) *
Centre for Communication Governance (CCG) at National Law University Delhi
Designation
Executive Director
Gender
Female
Economy of Residence
India
Primary Stakeholder Group
Academia
List Your Organizing Partners (if any)
Jason Grant Allen, Centre for AI and Data Governance (CAIDG) at Singapore Management University (SMU), jgallen@smu.edu.sg
Part 2 - Session Proposal
Session Title
Contextualising Fairness: AI Governance in Asia
Session Format
Tutorial (60 minutes)
Where do you plan to organize your session?
Online only (with onsite facilitator who will help with questions or comments from the floor)
Specific Issues for Discussion
In this tutorial session, we will discuss the challenges with fairness in AI systems and cover key components of the principle of fairness (equality, bias and non-discrimination, inclusivity, and reliability). These components are relevant globally, but are interpreted differently across jurisdictions. For eg. caste may not be relevant in the US or Europe but is a key aspect of non-discrimination in India. Understanding these components is essential to develop and deploy AI systems that uphold ethical principles and prevent potential harm, while enabling continued innovation.
We will discuss how ‘fairness’ is subjective in nature and must be tailored to specific regional and social contexts. Fairness in AI and related ethical norms and regulatory frameworks haves often been examined and developed with primary focus on the US and Europe. However, there are unique socio-cultural contexts across the APAC region that affect the notion of ‘fairness’ , making it ineffective to adopt existing metrics of fairness and apply them universally. Hence, in our tutorial, we will discuss what fairness entails in India and Singapore to showcase how the concept varies even within various jurisdictions across Asia.
Further, we will discuss case studies like the biassed AI job recommendation system in Indonesia to illustrate the complexities of fairness in AI. This will be followed by a simulation exercise with participant engagement to showcase how different biases creep into AI models and have discriminatory effects in society. The tutorial will end with an open discussion to gain perspectives from the participants on fairness metrics in their own countries and analyse how fairness as a concept differs based on socio-cultural contexts.
Recently, through a collaborative regional dialogue with SMU, we brought together diverse stakeholders from the APAC region to discuss the multifaceted concept of fairness in AI. This session aims to leverage the learnings from the dialogue.
Describe the Relevance of Your Session to APrIGF
The session relates to the theme of ethical governance of emerging technologies in the context of AI development and deployment. The increasing use of AI in sectors such as healthcare, finance, law, etc. has raised concerns about societal risks, necessitating ethical governance. The ethical governance of AI through the use of focused principles has gained traction over the last few years- one such key principle is that of fairness. In this tutorial session, we will look at the gap between the existing understanding of fairness as a principle and its implementation, and discuss the need for an APAC focused approach towards operationalising fairness, while accounting for the variation in the conception of what fairness entails even within the region.
Through a comparative analysis of fairness in India and Singapore, participants will explore the varying interpretations of fairness and will learn about the need for context-specific metrics of fairness to accommodate for regional, social, and local contexts. Using a hypothetical model, we will conduct a simulation exercise for participants illustrating how bias manifests through data points such as age, gender, address, etc. This exercise will showcase how biases in AI models can have discriminatory outcomes. The open discussion will allow participants to discuss and analyse different aspects of fairness in their own countries.
As an outcome of the session, the participants will have learned about what fairness entails, how the concept varies across jurisdictions, the need for context-specific fairness metrics, and how to identify biases and discrimination in AI models. The participants will be able to identify bespoke metrics to evaluate fairness in AI in their socio-cultural contexts and contribute to future conversations on AI governance. Building upon the insights from the session, we will upload a post on the CCG Blog and produce a podcast on the CCG Tech Podcast which will discuss key takeaways from the session.
Methodology / Agenda (Please add rows by clicking "+" on the right)
Time frame (e.g. 5 minutes, 20 minutes, should add up to 60 minutes) Description
5 minutes Introduction to the session (by the primary moderator)
10 minutes sectioned as 5 minutes per speaker (1) + moderator Overview of Fairness in AI (by a speaker and facilitator)
10 minutes sectioned as 5 minutes per speaker (2) Fairness in Singapore and India (by two speakers)
15 minutes Simulation Exercise for Participants: Bias and Discrimination in AI Models (by moderators)
15 minutes Open Discussion by Participants on Fairness Metrics in their Jurisdictions
5 minutes Reflection by Speakers and Closing
Moderators & Speakers Info (Please complete where possible)
  • Moderator (Primary)

    • Name: Nidhi Singh
    • Organization: Centre for Communication Governance at National Law University Delhi
    • Designation: Project Manager
    • Gender: Female
    • Economy / Country of Residence: India
    • Stakeholder Group: Academia
    • Expected Presence: In-person
    • Status of Confirmation: Confirmed
    • Link of Bio (URL only): https://ccgdelhi.org/meet-people/nidhi-singh
  • Moderator (Facilitator)

    • Name: Tejaswita Kharel
    • Organization: Centre for Communication Governance at National Law University Delhi
    • Designation: Project Officer
    • Gender: Female
    • Economy / Country of Residence: India
    • Stakeholder Group: Academia
    • Expected Presence: Online
    • Status of Confirmation: Confirmed
    • Link of Bio (URL only): https://ccgdelhi.org/meet-people/tejaswita-kharel
  • Speaker 1

    • Name: Jason Grant Allen
    • Organization: Centre for AI and Data Governance, Singapore Management University
    • Designation: Director
    • Gender: Male
    • Economy / Country of Residence: Singapore
    • Stakeholder Group: Academia
    • Expected Presence: Online
    • Status of Confirmation: Confirmed
    • Link of Bio (URL only): https://faculty.smu.edu.sg/profile/jason-grant-allen-6551
  • Speaker 2

    • Name: Jhalak M. Kakkar
    • Organization: Centre for Communication Governance at National Law University Delhi
    • Designation: Executive Director
    • Gender: Female
    • Economy / Country of Residence: India
    • Stakeholder Group: Academia
    • Expected Presence: Online
    • Status of Confirmation: Confirmed
    • Link of Bio (URL only): https://ccgdelhi.org/meet-people/jhalak-m-kakkar
  • Speaker 3

    • Name: Prateek Sibal
    • Organization: UNESCO
    • Designation: Programme Specialist
    • Gender: Male
    • Economy / Country of Residence: France
    • Stakeholder Group: Intergovernmental Organizations
    • Expected Presence: Online
    • Status of Confirmation: Confirmed
    • Link of Bio (URL only): https://en.unesco.org/inclusivepolicylab/users/prateek-sibal
Please explain the rationale for choosing each of the above contributors to the session.
Jason Grant Allen is the Director of the Centre for AI & Data Governance at the Singapore Management University. He has extensive expertise and experience in the intersection of law and emerging technology, especially in AI. As a seasoned academic, lawyer, and researcher, Jason offers valuable insights and perspectives on promoting fairness and accountability in AI systems.
Jhalak M. Kakkar is the Executive Director of the Centre for Communication Governance at National Law University Delhi which is a research centre that works on information law and policy issues. She has been extensively involved in academic and policy research on data governance, privacy, and emerging technologies such as AI. Jhalak has been an expert member of the Global Partnership on AI and a member of the United Nations Broadband Commission Working Group on AI Capacity Building as well. She has contributed to various capacity-building workshops on AI, including the UNESCO MOOC on AI and Rule of Law for judges.
Prateek Sibal is a technology policy researcher working to understand the impact of digital technologies, specially artificial intelligence (AI), on societies from a human rights, openness, inclusive access and multi-stakeholder governance perspective. He works at UNESCO’s Digital Innovation and Transformation section in Paris as a specialist consultant. His work involves providing policy advice to governments and developing programmes for reinforcing human and institutional capacities of policymakers and civil society organisations in developing countries.
Nidhi Singh is a Project Manager at the Centre for Communication Governance (CCG), National Law University Delhi. She works extensively on AI regulation and data governance, providing policy comments to the Indian government and international organisations like OHCHR on the design of AI regulation and data governance. She is also part of the Asian Dialogue on AI Governance (collaboration between Singapore Management University and Microsoft) and engages in discussions around principle and regulatory design around AI in countries like India, Singapore, South Korea, and New Zealand.
Tejaswita Kharel is a Project Officer at the Centre for Communication Governance (CCG) at National Law University Delhi. As a lawyer and researcher, her work relates to various aspects of information and technology law and policy including data protection, privacy and emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence and blockchain. Her work on the ethical governance and regulation of technology is guided by human rights based perspectives, democratic values, and constitutional principles.
Please declare if you have any potential conflict of interest with the Program Committee 2024.
No
Are you or other session contributors planning to apply for the APrIGF Fellowship Program 2024?
No
APrIGF offers live transcript in English for all sessions. Do you need any other translation support or any disability related requests for your session? APrIGF makes every effort to be a fully inclusive and accessible event, and will do the best to fulfill your needs.
In order to enable inclusive participation, we request for live transcription of our session. Additionally, since we aim to use interactive tools such as mentimeter, white-board, polling, etc. to engage with both the online and onsite participants, we request APrIGF to ensure that the online platform allows for online access for the use of these tools.
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